‘The Boss Baby: Family Business’ A Silly, Sweet Reprieve for Kids

A sequel to DreamWorks Animation’s 2017 Oscar-nominated blockbuster, The Boss Baby: Family Business is a welcome, comedic reprieve for children and their parents alike. From returning director Tom McGrath, the story of brothers Tim (James Marsden) and Ted (Alec Baldwin) Templeton continues, amplified by a new cast of zany, brainy characters fit for the big screen. 

Set decades after the original film, Family Business finds the fully-grown brothers living completely opposite lives – Ted is a hedge fund CEO, Tim a suburban stay-at-home dad to two daughters, seven-year-old Tabitha (Ariana Greenblatt) and newborn Tina (Amy Sedaris). Worrying that Tabitha is growing up too quickly at her prestigious school for advanced children, Tim yearns for his daughter to have a youthful, fun-filled imagination. Instead, she wants to be just like her Uncle Tim. 

(From left) Ted Templeton (Alec Baldwin), Tina Templeton (Amy Sedaris, back to camera) and Tim Templeton (James Marsden) in DreamWorks Animation’s The Boss Baby: Family Business, directed by Tom McGrath.

Enter: baby Tina, a top secret agent for Baby Corp. on a mission to uncover secrets about her sister’s school and its devious founder (Jeff Goldblum). On a mission to stop an evil genius, Tim and Ted set out on a journey together that ultimately reveals the true meaning of family. 

Based on the books by Marla Frazee, this sequel screenplay from Michael McCullers and McGrath is as enjoyable as its predecessor. With enthusiastic voice work from Baldwin, Goldblum, Marsden (additionally, Eva Longoria, Jimmy Kimmel and Lisa Kudrow), there is enough on screen to satisfy the youngest and oldest of viewers. Perhaps the most giggle-inducing, unsurprisingly, is Amy Sedaris in the role of baby agent Tina (lines like, “Men, am I right?” might go unappreciated by a young generation, but are sure to entertain a tired parent). “Each one of them is a wonderful ad-libber, and they brought so much to their roles,” producer Jeff Hermann says. “They shine every time they are on the screen.” While the plot and screenplay are joyous and silly, the obvious ad-libbing is a highlight.

After a long, difficult year for children, “silly” is something they deserve. Whether they see it on the big screen this Fourth of July weekend or stream it on Peacock, The Boss Baby: Family Business fits the bill.

Tina Templeton (Amy Sedaris) in DreamWorks Animation’s The Boss Baby: Family Business, directed by Tom McGrath.